How our link to Giorgio Vasari can even inspire techies

We were just featured on the Tech Talk Show podcast last week, and it was really eye-opening that our art and technology innovation platform at Vastari could also inspire those who are more involved in the technology space.

We were invited to discuss innovation with the Breakthrough Group CEO, Sue Nelson, and with Russ Shaw from Tech London Advocates (who actually featured Vastari in last year’s Creative 50 Companies) and two other startups, Synap and Automata. Synap is a quizzing software that helps students revise material more efficiently, from those learning “The Knowledge” for cab driving or those studying to become a doctor. Automata has developed customisable robots (one of them is charmingly called “Eva”) for industry, so that they can easily create automated processes for factories in Britain that currently still rely on workers doing really boring tasks.

Somehow, because of Vastari being first in the conversation, the whole podcast got a bit “arty”. I felt like there wouldn’t be any overlap with such a high-tech company like Automata for example, given they’re a robotics company - but it turns out that Mostafa from Automata used to work for Zaha Hadid Architects and trained in the craft. Giorgio Vasari, the art historian our company is named after, did write his book on “Artists, sculptors and architects” - the crafts are closely intertwined. Mostafa described in the conversation how his architectural background helped him and his team build much more effective tools to help industry.

To be fair, it makes sense that a company working in creative innovation would link to other startups because anyone setting up a business has to be creative, has to think outside the box and, ultimately, has to use design thinking to build something that people would like to use.

I was honoured that we got to discuss some really interesting topics, but if you want to hear it for yourself just click here and download the podcast to your phone.

(cover image: Giorgio Vasari’s “The Battle of Marciano in Val di Chiana.” PHOTO BY FINE ART IMAGES/HERITAGE IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES)